Grades: All Grades

Using tableaux to strengthen students’ literary analysis skills

On October 25 and November 1, Meg O’Brien and I will together share a theater strategy that can help students deeply analyze and understand complex texts and ideas: tableaux. Meg, who is Interim Co-Director of Education and the Access Coordinator at the Huntington Theatre Company teaches with me in our ninth grade Humanities class, encouraging students to use tableaux to literally embody ideas and pieces of literature. This seemingly simple structure helps them explore nuances of meaning, literary techniques, multiple perspectives, symbolism, and more. Working together on tableaux can also help students build social and emotional competencies. The best part? It’s not just for theater classes. Even students (and teachers!) with no background in acting or theater can be successful using this strategy.

On October 25th, we’ll introduce this strategy in a free, one-hour workshop. You’ll have opportunities to participate in some basic theater exercises, see and discuss student work, analyze how bringing tableaux into your class could address Common Core State Standards for ELA, and reflect on how you might incorporate these ideas into your own practice. By the time you leave, you’ll have concrete resources to help you get started with this technique in your own classroom.

On November 1st, we’ll reconvene to share ideas, debrief how it went, and help fine-tune everyone’s approach to this new strategy.

Register for this TeachingPartners Live Workshop now, and TeachingPartners will immediately send you an appointment you can drop right in your online calendar. You’ll also get a reminder closer to October 25th to make sure you’re ready.

Creating an environment that encourages inclusion students to feel welcome and confident in a general education classroom

On September 24th, I shared how I create an inclusive classroom environment for students with disabilities. I feel strongly that teachers should include students with disabilities in the general education classroom. An inclusive classroom environment is critical for building confidence, self-esteem, and a permanent sense of normalcy for students with disabilities. My students get the same attention as other students, don’t feel secluded, and don’t feel uncomfortable when answering questions.

I’ve found there are some essential things every teacher can do to make sure that she creates that inclusive environment. You can ensure that you understand the range and complexity of disability types; understand the unique needs of each student; apply the human elements that students need to feel safe and included; and implement simple routines that help foster a lasting sense of belonging.

I shared the strategies I’ve found to be most impactful in a free, one-hour workshop that gives you the information you need to begin to think about how to make your own classroom environment more inclusive.

You can find a video archive of this session under the “Session 1” tab above.

Our group will meet again on October 1st to share ideas and to help fine-tune everyone’s approach to this new strategy.

Using collaborative technologies to engage students in authentic, content-specific conversations

On October 11th and 18th, I’ll be sharing the strategies I’ve found make it possible for students to engage in safe, productive, and authentic online conversations.

I’ll share the approaches I use in my own classroom to ensure that my students make the most of their chance to connect globally with people who are not like them; and to ensure that they become better critical evaluators of sources of information they find online. I’ll also share strategies that help protect my students when they’re online: How I help my students develop codes of behavior when interacting online, for example. How I help them to understand how to safely and appropriately make use of digital platforms: how to help them understand that what they do online might affect others; how what they publish will exist permanently; and how they need to be diligent about citing sources.

On October 11th, I’ll share these approaches in a free, one-hour workshop that gives you the information you need to make it possible for students to get even more out of their learning-based online communication. You’ll have a chance to reflect about what I’ve presented and to begin to personalize the resources and practices for your own classroom. Then, our group will meet again on October 18th to share ideas and to help fine-tune everyone’s approach to this important.

Register for this TeachingPartners Live Workshop now, and TeachingPartners will immediately send you an appointment you can drop right in your online calendar. You’ll also get a reminder closer to October 11th to make sure you’re ready.